free web site hit counter Add us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
LeftHomeOnline StoreLearning CenterScruffy Guider CollarContactRightWelcome! Misty Pines is the Complete Pet Company, that loves the Company of people and their pets.
Misty Pines Gazette

April 2015
Volume XI: Issue 4

Table of Contents

Happy Easter

Upcoming Events for:

April

4

4

8

11

11

15

18
 
 

18

19

25

26

Recall/Walking

Easter Egg Hunt

Starter Orientation

Agility

Clicker Workshop 1

Puppy Orientation

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Test Prep

Clicker Workshop 2

Agility

Clicker Workshop 3

Dock Diving 101

...more

Sat. 2:30 Schedule Change

Please note that there has been a change to the Saturday 2:30 class format that will begin on Saturday, April 4th.

The Saturday 2:30 class will now feature specialty training of various topics. Advanced class attendees are encouraged to join the 1:15 class.

Upcoming classes:

Easter Egg Hunt: Saturday, April 4th.

Clicker Workshop: Saturday, April 11th, 18th & 25th.
Details to follow.

Kids Class: Saturday, May 2nd.

Intro to Scent Work: Saturday, May 9th, 16th & 23rd.
Space is limited.

Head Halter Application class: Saturday, May 30th.

Sat. 4:45 Schedule Change

Please note that April 4th will be the last Saturday 4:45 PM Starter Class.

Puppy and Starter Test Outs will remain the same days of the month (2nd and 4th Saturdays, respectively) and will still be held at 4:45 PM.

Sunday Classes

Thank youWe'd like to say "Thank You" to all of you who attended our Saturday All Levels and Conformation Classes.

The All Levels Obedience Class and the Conformation will end on Sunday, March 29th. We hope you all enjoyed the class as much as we enjoyed spending time with you these past Sunday afternoons.

Don't forget that we have two All Levels classes each Tuesday; one at 10:00 AM and the other at 6:30 PM so if you need to find a new class to attend, please consider one of these an alternative.

Recall & Walking Politely On A Leash Class - $17

Recall and Walking ClassSaturday, April 4th | 8:00 - 9:00 AM
Saturday, May 2nd
Saturday, September 5th

All Levels Welcome

Recall

Does your dog come running quickly every time you call his name? Or, does he have selective hearing when you say the word come? This specialty class will teach the art of recalls, or coming when called.

If your dog ignores your calls while outside or while in class, or even if your dog has a very strong recall, but you still want extra practice, then this class is for you. Throughout the class we will be offering different techniques, tips, and exercises dealing with strengthening your dog's recall command. Please pre-register.

Walking Politely On A Leash

Having a dog that is a pleasure to walk is, well...a pleasure. We want to help you enjoy your time outdoors with your dog and make your walking time enjoyable. We'll be working on Heel, Easy, Take-a-Walk and This Way, as well as helping you distinguish between a training walk and a pleasure walk.

Class will be indoors and outdoors. Please dress appropriately.

Product Spotlight

Dogswell Meatballs

dogswell Meatballs
dogswell Meatballs

 

April Sales

Seresto Flea & Tick Collars

Seresto® for dogs Voted Best New Flea & Tick Control

See for yourself what Seresto® has to offer, and why dog owners like you choose this easy-to-use collar to help protect their dogs against fleas and ticks.

  • No need to remember to apply monthly
  • KILLS fleas
  • REPELS and KILLS ticks
  • If a tick is repelled or killed, it cannot attach to your dog and transmit organisms that may cause disease.
Seresto Flea and Tick Collars 25% Off Quick Baths.

CLASSES & EVENTS

Recall & Walking Nicely On A Leash

Saturday, April 4th @ 8:00 AM

Easter Egg Hunt

Saturday, April 4th @ 2:30 PM

Agility

Saturday, April 11th & 25th @ 8:00 AM

Clicker Workshop

Saturday, April 11th, 18th & 25th @ 2:30 PM

Puppy Test Out

Saturday, April 11th @ 4:45 PM

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Prep Class

Saturday, April 18th @ 8:00 AM

Starter Test Out

Saturday, April 25th @ 4:45 PM

Dock Diving 101

Sunday, April 26th @ 12:00 - 2:00 PM

LOOKING AHEAD

CGC/TDI Test

Friday, May 1st. Tests beginning at 5:30.

Recall & Walking Nicely On A Leash

Saturday, May 2nd @ 8:00 AM

Kids Class

Saturday, May 2nd @ 2:30 PM

Dock Diving Class

Sunday, May 3rd @ 9:00 - 10:30 AM

Remote Recall Training Workshop

May: Monday 4th, Wednesday 6th & Monday 11th @ 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Agility

Saturday, May 9th & 23rd @ 8:00 AM

Intro to Scent Work

Saturday, May 9th, 16th & 23rd @ 2:30 PM

Puppy Test Out

Saturday, May 9th @ 4:45 PM

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Prep Class

Saturday, May 16th @ 8:00 AM

Dock Diving Fun Trial

Sunday, May 17th | Jumps at 10:00 AM and 12:00 PM with Final Jump at 3:00

Starter Test Out

Saturday, May 23rd @ 4:45 PM

Nuisance Behaviors

Saturday, May 30th @ 8:00 AM

Head Halter Application Class

Saturday, May 30th @ 2:30 PM

Training Your Dog To Walk Politely On A Leash

By: Jeff Woods, CPDT-KA, CBCC-KA

dogs walking politely on leash.Walking your dog politely on a loose leash is one of most difficult behaviors for dog and human to perform together, especially for any length of time and distance. Walking your dog on a leash is a mental and physical exercise for both you and your dog. It is one of the many ways to connect and bond. I myself always feel better after walking my dog, and I sense my dog feels better also.

There are several walking behaviors and combinations of these behaviors for you and your dog to learn. Training these behaviors make a walk fun and challenging for both you and your dog.

“Heel” is a traditional formal walking behavior where your dog is walking parallel to you on your left side. “This Way” is a walking behavior where the dog is trained to turn and walk anywhere with you on a loose, 6 foot leash. “Easy” means to walk slowly. “Pull” means to pull you only on command, which comes in handy when walking uphill. The majority of dogs enjoy pulling. “Take a break” allows the dog to sniff the ground. Smelling the environment is an extremely valuable reward. Dogs have 220 million scent receptors and love to investigate, explore, and check out odors in their environment. Giving a cue to your dog to check out the environment as part of walking politely can be highly rewarding and enjoyable.

Walking your dog should not be a time for your dog to pull you and scent-mark all over the neighborhood. When dogs scent mark, they are defining to you and to all the neighborhood dogs that they own that territory. In turn the other dogs in the neighborhood scent mark over your dog’s scent mark. Scent marking is often perceived as a challenge by other dogs and can lead to arousal or aggression. Marking is also disruptive to a training walk.

The goal is to teach your dog to walk on a loose leash. Begin the training session by asking your dog to sit. The conventional way is to stand on your dog’s right side, facing the same direction. Take the leash in your left hand, holding it approximately two feet from your dog. Show them a treat or toy held in the right hand. Say “heel” and walk forward, keeping your dog’s attention on the object or treat in your right hand. Take two steps, stop and simultaneously ask your dog to “sit” parallel to your left side facing the same direction as you. Reward with calm praise and a food treat. Repeat “heel,” gradually taking more steps between each halt. Use an upbeat, animated tone to keep your dog’s attention.

Say “heel” and praise a dog whenever it walks beside you. Read and listen to your dog’s body language, before they indicate that they are going to pull, stop and instruct them to sit and to look at you, reward and start “heel” again. Always train “heel” in new locations in short sequences of distance. Ensure your two step heel is reliable before moving on to a four-step heel, then to a six-step heel and so on. Using a hand signal simultaneously as your left leg stops often helps dogs to sit expediently and parallel on your left side. If your dog is pulling without being told to, stop, encourage your dog to come closer to you and start the heeling over again. Certain breeds are more inclined to pull because of selective breeding for this trait, such as the Siberian husky, Alaskan Malamute, or Bernese Mountain Dog. If your dog continues to pull without being asked, a head halter collar may be helpful. There are many types of collars to aid you in teaching your dog to heel.

Dogs heeling with owners.

It is outside the scope of this article to discuss all the various techniques and methods of teaching owners and dogs to walk politely on a leash. Seek out a professional dog trainer to teach you the various techniques and methods of teaching your dog to heel, and the other walking behaviors. Once these behaviors are trained into your dog, you and your dog will enjoy and gain the many benefits of walking your dog politely on a loose leash.

On Saturday, April 4th and Saturday, May 2nd we will have a Recall and Walking Politely On A Loose Leash class at 8:00 AM. This class will focus on two of the most important behaviors for you and your dog to master. Information below:


Recall & Walking Politely On A Leash Class - $17

Recall and Walking ClassSaturday, April 4th | 8:00 - 9:00 AM
Saturday, May 2nd
Saturday, September 5th

All Levels Welcome

Recall

Does your dog come running quickly every time you call his name? Or, does he have selective hearing when you say the word come? This specialty class will teach the art of recalls, or coming when called.

If your dog ignores your calls while outside or while in class, or even if your dog has a very strong recall, but you still want extra practice, then this class is for you. Throughout the class we will be offering different techniques, tips, and exercises dealing with strengthening your dog's recall command. Please pre-register.

Walking Politely On A Leash

Having a dog that is a pleasure to walk is, well...a pleasure. We want to help you enjoy your time outdoors with your dog and make your walking time enjoyable. We'll be working on Heel, Easy, Take-a-Walk and This Way, as well as helping you distinguish between a training walk and a pleasure walk.

Class will be indoors and outdoors. Please dress appropriately.

Click here to register for class.



Life Cycles of the Flea, Tick and Mite

Despite their small size, fleas and ticks can present a large problem for pet owners. While fairly easy to prevent and control with modern treatments, it is important for owners to understand all life cycles of the parasites. Controlling each life cycle is the key to avoiding a problem. Listed below are the life cycles of three of the most common parasites encountered in Western Pennsylvania.

Life Cycle of the Flea

The Flea (siphonaptera) is a blood-feeding parasite which can be transferred from host to host. The adult fleas can live as long as 2 years without feeding. Permitted to go unchecked, they can transmit internal parasites, such as tapeworms. They can also be carriers for diseases such as Endemic Typhus.

There are four stages in the flea life cycle: eggs, larvae, pupae, and adult. The entire life cycle takes just 15 days when temperature and humidity are ideal. However, pupae can remain dormant for up to one year in extremely cold weather.

Only adult fleas bite your pet to feed on their blood. Each adult female can lay 30-50 eggs per day and produce up to 1,000 eggs in her short lifetime (up to two years). This means that in just thirty days, 25 adult female fleas can produce up to a quarter of a million fleas!

  1. The adult female flea will feed for 2 or 3 days and begin laying eggs. She will lay a few eggs at a time until several hundred have been produced. These eggs are not attached to the host and will normally fall off into the carpet, animal’s bedding, or the grass.
     
  2. These eggs hatch into legless larvae. The larvae feed on debris and adult flea feces for 4 to 8 days.
     
  3. The larvae then spins a cocoon. Depending on conditions, an adult flea may begin to emerge from the cocoon in as little as 5 days.
     
  4. The adult flea emerges ready to begin the cycle again. The complete life cycle of the flea may take as little as 3 weeks.

Flea life cycle

Life Cycle of the Tick

The Tick (ixodidae) is an arachnid, or relative of the spider of which most varieties require hosts to reach maturity. It is a blood-feeding parasite. The adult tick waits for a suitable host, and can survive for 2 years without feeding while waiting to drop or crawl onto the host animal. The adult tick feeds and mates on the host.

Ticks also have a four-stage life cycle: egg, larvae, nymph, and adult. However, ticks require a blood meal to progress to each successive life cycle stage after hatching from an egg. Therefore, each tick has three opportunities throughout its life to attach to your pet and simultaneously transmit disease. Plus, each female tick lays approximately 3,000 eggs - greatly increasing your pet’s odds of tick exposure.

  1. A female tick remains on the host for 6 to 30 days. The blood-engorged female then drops off the host to lay her eggs. Within 3 to 83 days, she can lay 1,000 to 3,000 eggs.
     
  2. In approximately 30 days, the eggs hatch into 6-legged larvae or “seed ticks”. After 24 days, the “seed ticks” attach themselves to a host and feed for 3 to 6 days.
     
  3. After engorging themselves, the “seed ticks” drop off and molt in 1 to 2 weeks. They emerge from this stage as 8-legged nymphs. The nymphs attach themselves to the host and feed for 4 to 9 days.
     
  4. After feeding, the nymphs drop off and molt into adults. This molting process takes about 12 days. After approximately 30 days, the adult ticks are ready to attach themselves to another host animal and begin a new cycle.

Tick life cycle

Life Cycle of the Sarcoptic Mange Mite

Parasitic mites that cause mange in mammals embed themselves either in skin or hair follicles in the animal. Sarcoptic mange, also known as canine scabies, is a highly contagious infestation of Sarcoptes scabiei canis, a burrowing mite. The canine sarcoptic mite can also infest cats, pigs, horses, sheep, and various other species. The human analog of burrowing mite infection, due to a closely related species, is called scabies (the "seven year itch").

  1. The Sarcoptic Mange Mite (Sarcoptes scabiei ver canis) is a burrowing parasite. The infection it causes is due largely to the burrowing activity and irritation caused by the feeding process. The female mite probably does not live longer than 3 to 4 weeks.
     
  2. The female burrows a tunnel into the skin about 4 to 5 days after being fertilized; she extends the tunnel or makes a new one, laying eggs 1 or 2 at a time, about 3 to 5 being deposited daily.
     
  3. After 3 to 5 days, the eggs hatch, producing 6-legged larvae. Some larvae leave the breeding tunnel and wander on the skin; others remain in the parent tunnel or side pockets of it.
     
  4. The burrowing larvae, by a molting process, pass through 2 nymphal stages which may take place in the larval pockets or while wandering and making new pockets. The nymphs have 4 pairs of legs but no genital apertures.
     
  5. Finally males and females are produced. The development from the time the eggs are laid lasts about 17 days. The female may remain in the molting pocket until fertilized by the male, beginning a whole new cycle.

Tick life cycle

Thankfully, all of these pests can be easily prevented and controlled using modern treatments. There are a plethora of options, and the Misty Pines Staff can help you choose the right treatment for your pet.

During the month of April Seresto collars are on sale at Misty Pines for 15% off. Seresto collars offer 8 months of protection against fleas and ticks at a price comparable to that of 3 months of treatment from Frontline or Advantix II. View the video in the Product Spotlight section above to see how effective a Seresto collar is at killing ticks. The Seresto collar is shown to kill approximately 12 ticks in 15 minutes, with the collar seen affecting the ticks within the first minute of contact with the dog's fur. More details about the Seresto collar can be found in the section above.

Seresto Logo



Therapy Dog Visits

Locations To Visit

Once your dog has passed their Therapy Dog International certification, it's time for the fun to begin. Click the link below for a list of places that are always looking for registered therapy dogs to brighten the day of the patients and residents:

Baden Memorial Library
Dog reading program. Need volunteer for 2 Thursdays per month from 5:00pm - 6:30pm
and 1 Saturday per month for 1 1/2 hours.
Contact: Kathleen Wagner kwagner@beaverlibraries.org

Gateway Hospice
Contact: Sr. Linda Larkman OSB, Volunteer Coordinator 412-737-0969

West Haven Manor
Contact: Karen Zimmerman, Coordinator of Volunteer Services 724-727-3451
kzimmerman@qualitylifeservices.com

North Hills Health and Rehabilitation Center
Contact: Teri A. Slimick 724-935-3781
TASlimick@SavaSC.com

McGuire Memorial
Contact: Susan Matlock 724-843-3400
smatlock@mcguirememorial.org

Excela Health Home Care and Hospice (Westmoreland County)
Contact: Joan Roth, Volunteer Coordinator
724-689-1653
jroth@excelahealth.org

Family Hospice Palliative Care
www.familyhospice.com/
Contact: Pam Tomczak 412-572-8803

Western Pa. Humane Society coordinates visits to multiple locations in the community with volunteers who have Certified Therapy Dogs.
Contact: Joy Kealey
joy.kealey@wpahumane.org.

Odyssey Health Care
Cliff Mine Rd., Pittsburgh
Contact: Barbara Coulter 1-800-861-8584

Condordia of Franklin Park
Contact: Carol Kosela 724-935-1075 ext. 103

VA Hospitals in Pittsburgh
Activities Director: 412-688-6000 ext. 3682

Country Meadows (South Hills)
Activities Director: 412-257-4566

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh
Volunteer Coordinator: 412-690-6508

Animal Friends also coordinates a Pet Assisted Therapy program that visits multiple locations. To join their therapy group contact:

Ann Cadman: (412) 847-7031
pettherapy@animal-friends.org

Allegheny General Hospital
Jennifer Kopar: 412-359-3067
jkopar@wpahs.org

Tail Waggin Tutors at Baden Library
Laura Bain: 724-869-3960

Heartland Hospice
Barb Kralik, Volunteer Coordinator: 412-919-5617
heartlandvcs@gmail.com

Caring Hospice Services
Brittany Bailey, Volunteer Coordinator: 412-563-3300
bbailey@caringhospice.com

Concordia of Wexford
Michelle Moon: 724-935-1266

Passavant Memorial Homes and Subsidiaries
Colleen Perry, Social Services Coordinator: 412-820-1015 ext. 521
cperry@passavant.org

Services & Teams

If you would like to have Therapy Dogs visit your facility, please contact one of the following Therapy Dog Teams or contact Misty Pines to have your facility listed in the above section so that our teams may contact you. Click the link below for teams that are interested in visiting those in need of therapeutic visits from their furry friends:

Pets With Heart, Pet Therapy
Sister Sharon Costello: 724-869-6545
sharon@sisterspettherapy.com

"The golden gift is this: Intimately connected with his own emotions, the dog cannot lie. What he feels, he expresses. What he shows in his body posture is true, without guile, completely and utterly honest. Distanced from our own feelings, bound by our fears, we treasure and are amazed by this quality of complete truth in our dogs."

Click here to subscribe to our Misty Pines Gazette Newsletter
and stay informed of Upcoming Events

     
Animal Friends Dogs Adopted for Friendship APDT Ruffed Grouse Society WPHS

© 2015 Misty Pines Dog Park Company