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Misty Pines Gazette

August 2016
Volume XIII: Issue 8

Table of Contents

Cannon at Misty Pines.

Upcoming Events for:

August

5

6

9

10

13

17

20

27

CGC/TDI Test

CGC/TDI Prep Class

North Park Class

Starter Orientation

Agility

Puppy Orientation

CGC/TDI Prep Class

Agility

...more

Kids Camp Recap

Kids Camp 2016 was awesome! Two weeks of hands-on dog training experience for kids, two weeks of helping kids learn to work with their dogs, two weeks of spending time with the next generation of "dog people," two weeks of fun.

During each week the kids were taught how to work with their dogs and teach them dogs basic obedience and agility obstacles. Often times our dogs can see children as other puppies to play with so it's important to teach kids how to be leaders for their dogs and establish a working relationship with the family pet. We were privileged to see many first time visitors to Kids Camp learn, in just 3 days, how to give their dogs instructions, reward good behavior, teach their dog multi-step behaviors, lead their dog through various distractions and obstacles and how to be a leader that their dog can count on for guidance and direction. Those that were returning campers grew in their skills and this year we had two previous campers return as helpers.

Of course, it can't all be work, can it? Sure it can! When you incorporate training into playtime even the work seems like fun. During our nature walks the kids are teaching their dogs to walk nicely on leash, which in itself is a major accomplishment, but beyond just a walk they are taking their dogs into a distraction rich environment full of birds, squirrels, kids and other dogs; believe it or not all 47 dogs over the two weeks walked nicely for their kids.

We always like to take the kids to the pond for a swim. During the hot summer months nothing is better than taking a dip in refreshingly cool water. This is another opportunity for the kids to teach their dogs to work around distractions and also to teach their dogs to swim if they don't already know how. Our second week of camp was so hot we visited the pond on two days instead of just one. This is typically a favorite activity for kids and dogs alike.

We end each day with short videos that teach various aspects of how kids can be safe around dogs and give advice on proper care for our dogs. The campers were also given a demonstration on proper hygiene by our Grooming Manager, Maura. She taught about different combs and brushes for different coat types, how to properly brush a dog, when nails should be trimmed, how to clean ears and brush teeth and other aspects of keeping their dogs healthy and clean.

As each Kids Camp ends we are always sorry to see them go but are hopeful that we will see them all again in classes or just to bring their dog to the park for some outdoor fun and training.

If you have a kid that would like to attend Camp next year or perhaps know someone whose child would like to attend, we have posted the dates, which are July 10 - 12 and July 24 - 26, and you can register online.

We took pictures during Kids Camp to document the time that we spent with the kids. Pictures are available on our Facebook page.

North Park

Tuesday, August 9th | 6:30 - 7:30 PM
Tuesday, September 13th | 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Misty Pines Pet Company will be holding a special location dog training class in North Park. Class will be meeting at the North Park Swimming Pool parking lot at 6:30 PM. Please bring all of your usual tools needed for class and be sure to have a treat bag filled with your dog’s most favorite treats. You may want to skip feeding your dog lunch this day to ensure you have your dog’s full attention. Please sign up and prepay in advance. This class is open to students from all levels of classes.

Location
At Misty Pines we work towards building solid obedience and behavior throughout any distraction that we may come across. To solidify these behaviors we work through four variables of dog training; Distance, Distraction, Duration, and Location. Location is perhaps one of the most important variables of training a dog to cope with everyday situations such as someone coming to your door or taking your dog to the park on a sunny afternoon. As a general rule, a dog will only work where it has been taught to do so. Therefore, if the only place that you ever practice obedience such as heeling and stays is here in training class or at home in your living room, it is likely that your dog will find it difficult to hold their focus while faced with the unique distractions present in a new location. Keep in mind that when we change a criteria or variable in training, we make a command new again. Remember that you may need to take a step back and teach the sit command with lure and reward techniques the first time in a new location so that the dog learns to “listen” at this new place with unique distractions.

August Specials

20% Off Any book from our library!

It going to be time to go back to school before you know it so get your dog ready for class. We have books on any subject for your dog; housetraining, basic obedience, body language, tricks, dog stories and more.

Speaking of books for dogs: don't forget, all you TDI dog owners, that we have a couple libraries listed at the bottom of the Gazette that would like volunteers for reading programs. Most often they will have sessions where children can come and read to dogs to boost their confidence. Sometimes these children are nervous to read to adults because they fear criticism yet it has been shown that they do not have the same view of dogs therefore enabling them to get much needed practice reading out loud. If interested, contact:

Cranberry Township Library
Dog reading program. Looking for 3-4 dogs, the third Thursday of each month from 6:30 – 7:30 pm
Contact: Annemarie Lamperski.

Baden Memorial Library
Dog reading program. Need volunteer for 2 Thursdays per month from 5:00pm - 6:30pm
and 1 Saturday per month for 1 1/2 hours.
Contact: Kathleen Wagner

Dog reading a book

Product Spotlight

NaturVet Cranberry Relief™ For use in dogs and cats over the age of six weeks. Recommended to help maintain and support a healthy urinary tract. Echinacea has been added to provide essential immune support to help maintain overall health.

    Active Ingredients per enclosed
    1cc scoop (powder):
  • Cranberry Extract 210 mg
  • Echinacea Purpurea 105 mg
  • Vitamin C (from Ester-C®) 34 mg
  • Oregon Grape Root 34 mg
    Active Ingredients per 1 Soft Chew:
  • Cranberry Extract 236 mg
  • Echinacea 118 mg
  • Calcium Ascorbate (Vitamin C) 79 mg
  • Astragalus Root 52 mg
  • Oregon Grape Root 39 mg
  • Marshmallow Root 23 mg

This and many other health supplements and vitamins can be found in the Health and Nutrition areas of the Misty Pines Retail Store.



CLASSES & EVENTS

CGC/TDI Test

Saturday, August 5th @ 5:30 PM

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Prep Class

Saturday, August 6th @ 8:00 AM

North Park

Tuesday, August 9th @ 6:30 PM

Agility

Saturday, August 13th @ 8:00 AM

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Prep Class

Saturday, August 20th @ 8:00 AM

Agility

Saturday, August 27th @ 8:00 AM

LOOKING AHEAD

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Prep Class

Saturday, September 3rd @ 8:00 AM

Agility

Saturday, September 10th @ 8:00 AM

North Park

Tuesday, September 13th @ 6:30 PM

CGC/TDI/Service Dog/Public Access Prep Class

Saturday, September 17th @ 8:00 AM

Agility

Saturday, September 24th @ 8:00 AM

Dog Nutrition Tips

By: The ASPCA

A balanced diet is critically important to your dog’s cell maintenance and growth and overall health. Barring any special needs, illness-related deficiencies, or instructions from your vet, your pet should be able to get all the nutrients he or she needs from high-quality commercial pet foods, which are specially formulated with these standards in mind.

But dogs of different ages have different nutritional requirements. So, how much—or how little—should you be feeding your four-legged friend? Read on to learn what your pet’s body needs at the various stages of life.

Nutrients Your Dog Needs

Nutrients are substances obtained from food and used by an animal as a source of energy and as part of the metabolic machinery necessary for maintenance and growth. There are the six essential classes of nutrients dogs need for optimum healthy living.

Water

Essential to life, water accounts for between 60 to 70% of an adult pet’s body weight. While food may help meet some of your pet's water needs (dry food has up to 10% moisture, while canned food has up to 78% moisture), pets must have fresh clean water available to them at all times. A deficiency of water may have serious repercussions for pets. A 10% decrease in body water can cause serious illness, while a 15% loss can result in death.

Proteins

Proteins are the basic building blocks for cells, tissues, organs, enzymes, hormones and antibodies, and are essential for growth, maintenance, reproduction and repair. Proteins can be obtained from a number of sources including animal-based meats such as chicken, lamb, turkey, beef, fish and eggs (which have complete amino acid profiles) and in vegetables, cereals and soy (but these are considered incomplete proteins).

Fats

Fats are the most concentrated form of food energy, providing your pet with more than twice the energy of proteins or carbohydrates. Fats are essential in the structure of cells, needed for the production of some hormones, and are required for absorption and utilization of certain vitamins. Fats also provide insulation and protection for internal organs. A deficiency of essential fatty acids (such as linoleic acid) may result in reduced growth or increased skin problems.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates provide energy, play a vital role in the health of the intestine, and are important for reproduction. While there is no minimum carbohydrate requirement, there is a minimum glucose requirement necessary to supply energy to critical organs such as the brain.

Fibers are kinds of carbohydrates that alter the bacterial population in the small intestine, which can help manage chronic diarrhea in dogs. For dogs to obtain the most benefit from fiber, the fiber source must be moderately fermentable. Moderately fermentable fibers—including beet pulp, which is commonly used in dog foods—are best to promote a healthy gut while avoiding the undesirable side effects of highly fermentable fibers, like flatulence and excess mucus.

Other examples of moderately fermentable fibers include brans (corn, rice and wheat) and wheat middlings. Foods that are high in fiber are not good for dogs with high energy requirements, and who are young and growing.

Vitamins

Tiny amounts of vitamins are necessary in dogs for normal metabolic functioning. Most vitamins cannot be synthesized in the body, and therefore are essential to obtain in the diet.

Minerals

Minerals are nutrients that cannot be synthesized by animals and must be provided in the diet. In general, minerals are most important as structural constituents of bones and teeth, for maintaining fluid balance and for their involvement in many metabolic reactions.

Feeding Your Adult Dog

Adult dogs require sufficient nutrients to meet energy needs and to maintain and repair body tissues. The amount you feed your adult dog should be based on his or her size and energy output. Activity levels may vary dramatically between pets, and will play an important role in determining caloric intake.

How Much to Feed Your Dog

The amount you feed your adult dog should be based on his or her size and energy output. For example, an animal with a normal activity level should receive what we call “maintenance” energy. A pampered lap dog may require just 10% of that, while an active pet who exercises regularly outdoors may require maintenance plus 20 to 40%.

You may need to adjust portions as you learn your dog’s ideal “maintenance” amount. Pet owners should always consult with their dog’s veterinarian to determine the best feeding schedule and types of foods for their pets.

Outside factors, like the temperature, can contribute to how much your dog should eat. Since keeping warm and cool require extra energy expenditure, extreme hot or cold weather can also increase a dog’s energy needs. Talk to your pet’s veterinarian about what to do when the mercury dips or soars.

Feeding Working Canines

A dog’s energy needs will increase with his or her work and stress level, and the dietary needs of working canines—such as police dogs, guide dogs and cattle dogs—will depend on their occupations. A dog with a moderate work load may require an energy increase of 40% compared to maintenance, whereas a dog with a high work load may require an extra 50 to 70%.

Feeding Your Dog as He Recovers from Surgery

An animal recovering from surgery or suffering from a disease may have an increased nutritional requirement for repair, healing and fighting infection. Be sure to check with your veterinarian on your pet’s post-opt nutritional needs.

Limiting Treats

Treats should be given in moderation and represent five percent or less of the dog’s daily food intake. The rest should come from a nutritionally compete dog food. When using treats as motivation, such as during training exercises, use the smallest pieces you can.

Setting a Feeding Schedule

We recommend all dogs be fed twice daily. Simply divide the amount of food your pet requires into two meals, spaced eight to twelve hours apart. Dogs may be fed in a number of ways that meet both the owner’s and the animal’s needs. These methods include portion-control, free-choice and timed feeding.

Portion-control feeding refers to controlling the amount of food that your pet consumes by measuring your pet’s food and providing it in one or meals daily. This method is often used for weight control programs and for animals that might overeat if fed free-choice.

Free-choice feeding allows food to be available to your pet at all times, as much as your pet wants, and whenever he or she wants it. This method is best when feeding dry food, which will not spoil when left out. Most nursing mothers are often free-choice fed, but some dogs will overeat when fed in this manner, resulting in obesity.

Timed feeding involves making a portion of food available for your pet to eat for a specific period of time. For example, food can be placed in the dog’s bowl for 30 minutes. After that time, if the pet has not consumed the food, it is removed.

Overweight Dogs

One of the most common pitfalls dog parents should watch out for is overfeeding. Attempts to shower our dogs with love by means of big meals and lots of tasty treats are sweet, but misguided. In dogs, as with humans, extra weight can lead to health problems. Be sure to indulge your four-legged friend with affection, not food!

Causes of Obesity in Dogs

Obesity is an extremely common problem in pets and, as with humans, it can be detrimental to the health of a dog. The overweight pet has many added stresses upon his body and is at an increased risk of diabetes, liver problems and joint pain.

Obesity develops when energy intake exceeds energy requirements. This excess energy is then stored as fat. The majority of cases of obesity are related to simple overfeeding coupled with lack of exercise. Certain groups of dogs appear to be more prone to obesity than others. Specific breeds, such as Labrador retrievers and pugs, and older dogs are particularly susceptible.

How to Tell if Your Pet is Overweight

There are a few ways easy ways to identify whether your pet has put on the pounds. You should be able to feel the backbone and touch the rubs in an animal of healthy weight. If you cannot feel your pet’s ribs without pressing, there is too much fat.

Also, you should see a noticeable waist between the back of the rib cage and the hips when looking at your pet from above. When viewed from the side, there should be a “tuck” in the tummy, meaning the abdomen should go up from the bottom of the rib cage to inside the thighs. Dogs who fail these simple tests may be overweight.

How to Help Manage Your Dog’s Weight

We have a few tips that can help your pet shed the extra padding. Please note, if your pup has put on weight, we recommend that you consult your pet’s vet before starting on a weight loss program.

  • Correct your pet’s diet. Overweight animals consume more calories than they require. Work with your veterinarian to select a more suitable food and determine your pet’s caloric requirements. The diet should contain a normal level of a moderately fermentable fiber and fat to prevent the skin and coat from suffering during weight loss.
  • Increase regular exercise. Increasing physical activity can be valuable to both weight loss and weight maintenance. Regular exercise burns more calories, reduces appetite, changes body composition and will increase your pet’s resting metabolic rate.
  • Modify your behavior. A successful weight management program means making changes in your behaviors that have contributed to your pet’s weight. For example, you may be giving your pet too many treats or not giving her enough opportunities to exercise.
  • Here are some ways you can commit to your pet’s weight loss:
  • Remove your pet from the room when the family eats
  • Feed your pet several small meals throughout the day
  • Reduce snacks and treats, and feed all meals and treats in your pet’s bowl only
  • Provide non-food related attention with lots of affection

Misty Pines carries Chicken Soup for the Soul Light Dog Food for dogs that are currently over-weight and need to shed some pounds and we also carry a variety of healthy foods such as Nature's Variety, Fromm and Primal pet foods to provide your dog a high quality, nutritious food. Giving your dog a well-balanced food and feeding proper amounts can help your dog maintain a healthy weight and enjoy a good quality of life. Stop in any time to learn more about the foods we carry and how Misty Pines can help you provide for the health and well-being of your dog.



Urinary Tract Infections: What To Look For

By: Dr. Marty Becker DVM

Have you ever had a bladder infection? Anyone who has is familiar with the aching, urgent feeling of needing to go right now and then only dribbling out a tiny bit of urine. You call your doctor, describe your symptoms, he prescribes antibiotics, and that’s the end of it.

It’s not so easy with dogs. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and urinary tract stones are common in dogs. Because these conditions can be painful, it's important to know what to watch for in your dog.

Signs of Urinary Tract Problems

When dogs get UTIs, they may strain or have difficulty urinating, it may be painful for them to urinate, and they may have blood in their urine.

Breaking housetraining is another possible sign of a bladder problem. You might not know that there’s blood in your dog's urine unless you see a pinkish stain on the carpet where he had an accident. Or you may notice that when you’re gone, your normally well-behaved dog is peeing near the door and producing a large volume of urine. It helps to be super observant about your dog’s urination habits so you will notice if he seems to be straining or taking longer than normal to urinate.

    Take your dog to the veterinarian if you notice the following signs:
  • Frequent urination
  • Breaking housetraining
  • Blood in the urine
  • Dribbling urine
  • Crying out while urinating
  • Straining to urinate
  • Frequently or obsessively licking the genital area
  • Determining the Cause

To get a diagnosis, your vet will need to analyze a urine sample for the presence of white blood cells, which signal infection, or crystals, which suggest that the dog may have bladder stones. A urinalysis is a start, but culturing the urine — taking a sample and letting bacteria grow — allows us to know for sure if there’s an infection and identify the bacteria causing it. It usually takes a few days to get the results of a urine culture.

Without a culture, your veterinarian can’t know exactly which antibiotic to prescribe or even if one is necessary. Because of the risk of developing antibiotic-resistant bacteria, we don’t like to prescribe antibiotics unless they are absolutely necessary and we know exactly which bacteria to target.

A culture also tells us other things about what might be causing the problem. For instance, it’s a long, hard slog for bacteria to make it all the way up the male urethra. We don’t see as many bladder infections in males because of that, so when they do have one, we know that something more serious may be going on, such as kidney or prostate infection or stones that are affecting the urinary tract.

Dogs can develop several types of urinary tract stones. We commonly see struvite stones, which often form in conjunction with bladder infections. We also see calcium oxalate stones. Any dog can get these, but small breeds such as Shih Tzus, Lhasa Apsos and Yorkshire Terriers seem to be predisposed to them, as are Miniature Schnauzers and Bichons Frises.

Some breeds are known for a predisposition to certain types of stones. Male Dalmatians are prone to urate stones, and Scottish Deerhounds and some Dachshunds and Bulldogs are likely to develop cystine stones.

If we suspect bladder stones, blood work and radiographs can help us to make a diagnosis. Occasionally, though, stones are difficult to find. Then we use more sophisticated procedures such as radiographs with dye, ultrasound or cystoscopy, which lets us take a look around inside the urethra and bladder.

Making a correct diagnosis is important. We never want to assume that a dog has a garden-variety urinary tract infection and miss the real problem.

Treatment and Prevention

Once we have a diagnosis, we can prescribe a specific antibiotic in the case of an infection or recommend a special diet to dissolve stones. Sometimes both are needed. For instance, struvite stones usually dissolve easily with an appropriate diet, and antibiotics may be needed to treat an accompanying urinary tract infection.

Can you do anything to prevent UTIs or stones in your dog? It’s not a silver bullet, but I always recommend a drinking fountain for pets. Getting more water into your dog is never a bad thing. Many pets are attracted to running water, so a fountain may encourage them to drink more. And for certain types of stones, we definitely want to see the dog drinking plenty of water and urinating frequently, because that’s going to wash the crystals out before they can get together and start turning into stones.

Sometimes nutraceuticals can be helpful adjuncts to UTI treatment. My colleague Mary H. Bowles, DVM, an internal medicine specialist at Oklahoma State University, says that based on successful studies in women, your veterinarian may recommend probiotics to help prevent recurring UTIs. Probiotics are thought to help by displacing the bacteria causing the infection and enhancing the immune system’s response to infection-causing bacteria.


NaturVet Cranberry Relief has been shown to slow the development of UTIs in dogs that have frequent issues and it has also been shown to help relieve symptoms of current UTIs. Results vary patient to patient and even case to case. Please see above for more information on NaturVet's Cranberry Relief.



Back To Schedule

It’s that time again: time to go back to school. Parents everywhere are rejoicing while kids everywhere are groaning. But really: why the difference in emotions? Why do parents long for this time of year? Are parents really that anxious to get rid of their offspring for a few hours a day? Let’s delve into this topic for a moment.

All joking aside the real reason is because we are now back on a schedule and though a lot of us adults don’t want to admit it, we love our schedules and routines. Wake up at 5:30. Take a shower. Get dressed. Make coffee. Wake the kids. Eat breakfast. Feed the dogs. Pack lunches. Adios! See you at 3:00. Work. Home at 5:30. Eat dinner. Homework and entertainment. Kids in bed at 9:00. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. What’s not to love about that? You can plan your life!

When you first have kids, there are only pseudo schedules. Bedtime is flexible because there is really no reason to need to be up early. Lunch time varies on your morning activities and dinner can happen whenever because…why not? School forces a child’s schedule to be upheld much the same way that work does for adults.

Why are we talking about adults and kids when this is about dogs?

Now that the rest of the family is on a schedule our pets should be on one too. Dogs are pack animals that thrive on routines, schedules and work. If they lack structure they are more likely to act out and have bad manners. Our schedules are pretty cut and dry and are largely put in place for us without the need to do much thinking about it. Our places of employment determine our hours of work during a day and our commute determines when we get home at night and when we need to leave in the morning. The school’s hours dictate when our children must arrive at school and when they leave and their bus schedule says when to be ready to leave and when they’ll arrive at home. Perhaps it would help to give our dog’s lives some of the same structure by providing a daily schedule for them. While they do not have the demands on their time that we do they still crave structure but lack the means or ability to give it to themselves, so it is up to us to lend them a hand, or paw.

Begin by making their meals a part of your morning routine: pour your bowl of Cap N’ Crunch…I mean…Total, and then give them their meals for the morning. Before leaving for the day give them a raw bone in their crate or if they have free run of the house, perhaps a stuffed Kong, Bob-A-Lot or some other Prolonged Release Interactive Food Dispensing Device. If you think to yourself that you would like to get your dogs to daycare try to make it a habit of coming on the same day. Many of our clients have specific days that they come for daycare and have made that part of their dog’s lifestyle and routine. Believe it or not after a while they’ll start to know which day it is and wait by their door to come to play with their friends.

Daycare is a great option for providing structure, exercise and social interaction for our dogs. While visiting daycare at Misty Pines dogs are able to participate in a variety of activities that include obedience training, agility work, nature walks, afternoon snacks and more. Though the benefits of daycare can largely speak for themselves there cannot be enough said about the importance of giving your dog extra activities to break up their day and help keep them mentally sharp. Even a 15 minute training session can go a long way towards shoring up their manners and giving them some much needed mental stimulation. After all, it can't all be playtime.

Much like our children we love to see our dogs playing and having a good time but there comes a time when they need to take a break from the play and refocus. At Misty Pines we give each dog a break from playtime while they are here for daycare but that break is really not a substitute for a good, well suited activity. If your dog loves to fetch and play ball, then a session of play ball time would be the best option for your dog. Or maybe your dog enjoys running on a treadmill or agility or sniffing through the woods; no matter what your dog enjoys we have a program that they’ll love.

Beyond just daycare, think of incorporating your dog’s needs into your families evening routine as well. Get the family together for a few minutes of fun obedience work, such as fetching objects and returning them or a game of hide and seek to work on recall. Evening walks can be used for more than just letting Scruffy check his "pee-mail," you can incorporate behaviors that you have learned in your obedience classes such as; easy, heel, this way, pull or even sniff. Challenge your dog's minds by making them heel through portions of the walk and make random stops to make them sit. Frequent direction changes with a "this way" cue will keep them alert and keep their minds sharp. If you would like to give them a work-out, have them "pull" you up a long or steep hill. There are ways to include training into everything you do with your dog, just be creative.

Most of our evenings end with personal grooming before bed: brushing hair, brushing teeth, showers, cutting nails and so on. Don’t forget that your dog needs groomed as well. Take 10 minutes to brush out your dog’s coat each evening as a calming down time before bed. Use this time to examine ears, nails, feet and all your dog’s parts to make sure they’re healthy and staying clean. Dogs often need help keeping up with their ears, so this is a great time to clean their ears as well. A simple cotton ball with some wintergreen alcohol will remove the waxy build-up and leave their ears smelling nice and fresh. If you’re comfortable and have had some practice you could even cut their nails. If you’re not up to that particular task feel free to bring your pup to Misty Pines and we’ll get those nails trimmed in no time. As a matter of fact, Misty Pines can handle all your grooming needs but even our professional groomers can’t make up for the daily brushing and care of your dog’s skin and coat.

    Let’s recap how to include your dogs into our daily lives and give them a schedule to provide a stable routine:
  1. Include your dog’s feeding into your morning routine.
  2. Provide mentally and physically stimulating activities such as Interactive toys or bringing the dog to daycare.
  3. Feed the dog during or around your dinner time.
  4. Incorporate your dogs into your evening family time with fun obedience games.
  5. Include training into your walks to provide mental stimulation and keep your leash handling skills sharp.
  6. Provide for your dog’s grooming needs with evening brush outs and examinations.

If you have any questions regarding how to help your dog have a schedule or how to incorporate your dog into your lifestyle please e-mail or call Misty Pines and our professional staff will be happy to give you suggestions. While speaking with our staff you may also schedule daycare or grooming visits.



Therapy Dog Visits

Locations To Visit

Once your dog has passed their Therapy Dog International certification, it's time for the fun to begin. Read below for a list of places that are always looking for registered therapy dogs to brighten the day of the patients and residents:

Interroom Hospice
Contact: Barbara Hammil - 412-371-3726.

Washinton-Greene Alternative Residental Services
Contact: Valerie Loughman - 724-228-7716.

Community Options
Contact: Jessica Kubas - 412-431-7079.

Heritage Hospice
Contact: Erica Kinkade - 724-334-6600.

Adelphoi
Contact: Bethanne Petrylak - 570-579-8700.

Remed
Contact: Tina - 412-477-0901.

Cranberry Township Library
Dog reading program. Looking for 3-4 dogs, the third Thursday of each month from 6:30 – 7:30 pm
Contact: Annemarie Lamperski.

Baden Memorial Library
Dog reading program. Need volunteer for 2 Thursdays per month from 5:00pm - 6:30pm
and 1 Saturday per month for 1 1/2 hours.
Contact: Kathleen Wagner

Gateway Hospice
Contact: Sr. Linda Larkman OSB, Volunteer Coordinator - 412-737-0969

West Haven Manor
Contact: Karen Zimmerman, Coordinator of Volunteer Services - 724-727-3451

North Hills Health and Rehabilitation Center
Contact: Teri A. Slimick - 724-935-3781

McGuire Memorial
Contact: Susan Matlock - 724-843-3400

Excela Health Home Care and Hospice (Westmoreland County)
Contact: Joan Roth, Volunteer Coordinator - 724-689-1653

Family Hospice Palliative Care
www.familyhospice.com/
Contact: Pam Tomczak - 412-572-8803

Western Pa. Humane Society coordinates visits to multiple locations in the community with volunteers who have Certified Therapy Dogs.
Contact: Joy Kealey.

Odyssey Health Care
Cliff Mine Rd., Pittsburgh
Contact: Barbara Coulter - 1-800-861-8584

Condordia of Franklin Park
Contact: Carol Kosela - 724-935-1075 ext. 103

VA Hospitals in Pittsburgh
Activities Director - 412-688-6000 ext. 3682

Country Meadows (South Hills)
Activities Director - 412-257-4566

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh
Volunteer Coordinator - 412-690-6508

Animal Friends coordinates a Pet Assisted Therapy program that visits multiple locations.
To join their therapy group or request visits contact Ann Cadman - 412-847-7031.

Allegheny General Hospital
Jennifer Kopar - 412-359-3067

Tail Waggin Tutors at Baden Library
Laura Bain - 724-869-3960

Heartland Hospice
Barb Kralik, Volunteer Coordinator - 412-919-5617

Caring Hospice Services
Brittany Bailey, Volunteer Coordinator - 412-563-3300

Concordia of Wexford
Michelle Moon - 724-935-1266

Passavant Memorial Homes and Subsidiaries
Colleen Perry, Social Services Coordinator - 412-820-1015 ext. 521

Services & Teams

If you would like to have Therapy Dogs visit your facility, please contact one of the following Therapy Dog Teams or contact Misty Pines to have your facility listed in the above section so that our teams may contact you. Click the link below for teams that are interested in visiting those in need of therapeutic visits from their furry friends:

Pets With Heart, Pet Therapy
Sister Sharon Costello: 724-869-6545
sharon@sisterspettherapy.com

Western Pa. Humane Society coordinates visits to multiple locations in the community with volunteers who have Certified Therapy Dogs.
Contact: Joy Kealey.

Animal Friends coordinates a Pet Assisted Therapy program that visits multiple locations.
To join their therapy group or request visits contact Ann Cadman - (412) 847-7031.

"The golden gift is this: Intimately connected with his own emotions, the dog cannot lie. What he feels, he expresses. What he shows in his body posture is true, without guile, completely and utterly honest. Distanced from our own feelings, bound by our fears, we treasure and are amazed by this quality of complete truth in our dogs."

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